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Leith Burgh Police War Memorial and the Memorial Roll of the officers who served in the Royal Navy and British Army between 1914 -1919

The Leith Burgh Police War Memorial

Most of the 61 men of Leith Burgh Police who volunteered for the Army and Navy had been discharged by early 1919 and a decision was taken to erect a memorial to the members of the force who had given their lives in the service of their country. Subscriptions were sought from members of the force and the wider Leith community  to fund the creation of a suitable memorial. 

 

Unveiling of the War Memorial 3 June 1920

On Thursday 3 June 1920, Provost Lindsay unveiled the War Memorial to the eighteen officers of Leith Burgh Police who died for their country between 1914 – 1918 in the Police Station in Queen Charlotte Street. ‘The Scotsman’ of Friday 4 June carried the following report:

 

“LEITH POLICE MEMORIAL UNVEILED: - Provost Lindsay yesterday unveiled in the Muster Room at Leith Police Office a tablet to commemorate the men of that Force who gave their lives for their country. A large company was present at the ceremony, including Lord Salvesen, Sir Malcolm Smith, members and officials of the Town Council, members and officials of the Dock Commission, and members of the Police Force and relatives. Provost Lindsay, in the course his address, stated that 61 men went from the Force into H.M. fighting  services, and 18 of these had made the supreme sacrifice. 

 

 

After the tablet was unveiled, a prayer was offered by the Rev. William Swan, South Leith Parish Church. The police pipers played the ‘Flowers of the Forest’ and ‘The Last Post’ was sounded.”

 

The names on the tablet are:

 

John Spears 

Alexander Laing

James M. Bruce

David Duncan 

Walter Inglis

Angus Cameron

Donald C. Menzies 

William R. Laing

James M.Todd

William Thornton 

Robert A. Whyte

George Clapperton

Alexander Robertson 

Alexander Macleod

Robert Stenhouse

Thomas B. Latto

Francis S. Eunson 

John Paterson

The Leith Burgh Police War Memorial in the former Force Headquarters, Queen Charlotte Street, Leith. This was created by Fireman Kilgour of Leith Fire Brigade. (see newspaper article below).

The Memorial Roll to Leith Burgh Police who served in WWI

The picture below is a Memorial Roll of all the officers of Leith Burgh Police who served in the Royal Navy or Army during World War 1. It was created by a serving Leith officer, PC George Edward Bland (No 37 in the list below), whose signature is on the rear. George Bland also served in the Royal Field Artillery during the War.

 

Sixty-one Leith officers served but there are sixty-two names on the roll, of whom, sixteen are listed as ‘Killed’ more usually, ‘KIA’ or killed in action and two, ‘Died’. All eighteen are listed on the War Memorial in the station.

 

The first name listed is that of Dr James Butler MB who served as a Temporary Captain in the Royal Army Medical Corps. His house was at 49 Queen Charlotte Street, Leith, next to the Police Headquarters and he was appointed Leith Police Surgeon in 1910 in succession to Dr Garland.[i]

 

A transcription of the names of all sixty-two can be seen below together with some biographical details on the individuals and what happened to them after the War.

 

The list on the Memorial Roll has some minor errors which have been corrected in the text below. The amount of detail available on each man varies quite considerably and it has been impossible to positively identify all the men. Much of the material comes from contemporary newspaper reports and the records of Edinburgh City Police held in the City Archives.

 

Please get in touch to add or correct any inadvertant errors. Thank you.

 

I am grateful to George Barnsley of Lanarkshire Police History Society for the image of the Memorial Roll.

 


[i]The Scotsman, 4 May 1910, page 8.

The Leith Burgh Police Memorial Roll, 1914 - 1918.
This explains that the Memorial Scroll was painted by PC George Bland of Leith Burgh Police
This PC is George Edward Bland, then serving in B Division of Edinburgh City Police in 1922. The two Inspectors in front of him are Burgess (l) and Scott (r). George Bland painted the Leith Burgh Police Memorial Scroll above.
Police Sergeant 22 A Joseph Obedia Macdonald MM, who served in Leith Burgh Police and then Edinburgh City Police. His story is at No. 31 below.
 

First Name

Last Name

Additional Information

1

James

Butler MB

James Butler MB is Dr James Butler of 49 Queen Charlotte Street, Leith, a few doors down from Leith Police Headquarters. 

 

He was appointed the force Police Surgeon in October 1910 and among his other duties, he was the Lecturer for the Police Ambulance Classes. 

 

'James Butler MB,' was promoted to temporary Captain in the Royal Army Medical Corps with effect from 15 July 1917 in Supplement to the London Gazette of 4 August 1917.

2

John

Spears (KIA)

John was a PC when he married in Newbattle on 31 December 1908. In the Census 1911, he was a Constable living at 13 Henderson Street, Leith with his wife, Jessie Milne McIntosh. They had been married 2 years with one child, John Macintosh Spears, born in 1912.  John (senior) was  born around 1882 in Carrington, Midlothian. He joined Leith Police on leaving the Army in 1908. 

 

He was awarded the King George V Coronation (Scottish Police) Medal, 1911 and was mentioned in The Scotsman newspaper of 23 July 1913 as a "Constable in Leith". 

 

De Ruvigny's Roll has the following entry: "SPEARS, JOHN, 2nd Lieut.m 2nd Battn. (21st Foot) The Royal Scots Fusiliers, son of Thomas Spears, by his wife Barbara, b. Carrington, Midlothian 10 March, 1882. educ. Borthwick School; enlisted in the 2nd Dragoons (Royal Scots Greys) 3 March 1900; served 8 years with the Colours, and joined the Reserve in 1908; was for nine years in the Leith  Police Force; was called up on mobilization on 4 August 1914; served with the Expeditionary Force in France;  gazetted 2nd Lieut. The Royal Scots Fusiliers in January 1917 and was killed in action at Arras 23 April following while leading his men. Buried at Arras. He m. at Newbattle, Jessie (27), (35 Balfour Street, Leith)." [i]

 

According to his Medal Index Card (MIC), he was a Sergeant in the Royal Scots Greys when commissioned. He was entitled to the 1914 Star, British War and Victory Medals.

3

James

Souness

James McGill Souness  was born on 3 February 1878 in Oldhamstocks, East Lothian and joined LBP on 13 October 1899. He was awarded the King George V Coronation (Scottish Police) Medal, 1911. 

 

Possibly Private 2338/120662 James Souness of the Lothian & Border Horse who was entitled to the British War and Victory Medals for his service in the war. 

 

Retired from Edinburgh City Police as a Sergeant on 3 April 1930.

4

David 

Duncan (KIA)

David was a PC ( 28) living at 29 Sloan Street, Leith in the 1911 Census with his wife Christina, (24)  and his sons, Robert, (4), John, 3) and David, (1). David was born in Dunbar, East Lothian around 1883. 

 

He was awarded the King George V Coronation (Scottish Police) Medal, 1911. 

 

It is possible he was Private 335165 David Duncan of the 5th/6th Battalion Royal Scots who died on 17 April 1917. He is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial on the Somme in France

5

Allan

Buchanan

Born in Portree, Skye, 14 October 1884. Allan joined LBP 17 February 1905.

He  served in the Army from 26 August 1915 to 19 March 1918. Allan lost his left arm as a result of wounds received in the war and transferred to CID for clerical work on 18 July, 1919. Awarded the 1914-15 Star, General Service (BWM) and Victory Medal, King George V Coronation (Scottish Police) Medal, 1911.

 

Transferred to Headquarters on joining Edinburgh City Police on 2 November 1920. 

 

Retired from Edinburgh City Police in 1933 as a PC In Headquarters.

6

George

Turnbull

George Herriot Turnbull was born on 2 January 1881 at Haddington, East Lothian and joined LBP on 10 March 1905.

 

He was a Shoemaker aged 18 years and 5 months when he enlisted as Private No. 6863 in the 3rd (Militia) Battalion the Royal Scots on 7 June 1897, having previously served in the 7th(Volunteer) Battalion. On 19 August that year, he enlisted as a regular soldier No. 6170 in the Royal Scots, having declared his previous service.

 

He reached the rank of Corporal in 1st Royal Scots by 1901 but reverted to Private at his own request when he transferred to the 2nd Battalion Gordon Highlanders, (No. 8555) on 31 December 1901. 

 

He took part in the South Africa Campaign 1899 – 1902 and was awarded the Queen’s South Africa Medal with clasps, ‘Cape Colony’, ‘Orange Free State’ and ‘Belfast’ and the King’s South Africa Medal with clasps, ‘South Africa 1901’ and ‘South Africa 1902’. He was transferred to the 1st Class Army reserve on 11 February 1905, shortly before he joined LBP.

 

George was living at 9 Hermitage Terrace Leith with wife, Mary D., and son in 1911. He was awarded the King George V Coronation (Scottish Police) Medal, 1911. 

 

The MIC of Private 325552, George H Turnbull, 13th Royal Scots. shows entitlement to British War and Victory Medals. His police personnel file shows he was a Sergeant in the Royal Scots.

 

George retired from Edinburgh City Police on 11 March 1935 as a Sergeant.

7

Isaac

Budge

Isaac Budge was born in Loth, Sutherland in 1883 and served in the South African Constabulary (Mounted) for 5 years as Trooper E2643. He was awarded the Queen's South Africa Medal with clasps, 'Cape Colony', 'Orange Free State', 'South Africa - 1901', 'South Africa - 1902' for his service in the 2ndBoer War.

 

He joined LBP on 26 April 1906.

 

He served in the Royal Garrison Artillery (Sergeant)  from 26 August, 1915 to 16 January, 1919 but there is no MIC in existence.

 

He was awarded the King George V Silver Jubilee Medal, 1935 and retired from Edinburgh City Police on 15 June 1936 as an Inspector.

8

Donald

Menzies  (KIA)

Donald was living with his widowed mother, Janet Menzies at 113 Pitt Street, Leith in the Census of 1911. He was awarded the King George V Coronation (Scottish Police) Medal, 1911. His mother was born in Logierait, Perthshire and Donald was born in the village of Dull, Perthshire. 

 

Most likely,  Gunner No. 125923 Donald Menzies, 110 Heavy Battery, Royal Garrison Artillery, enlisted in Edinburgh, born in Perthshire, killed in action in France or Flanders on 30 April 1918.

9

William

Thornton (KIA)

William Thornton was born in England around 1885 and served in the Royal Garrison Artillery before he joined Leith Burgh Police around 1907. In the Census of 1911, he was a PC living as a Boarder with the Thomson family at 40 Buchanan Street, Leith. William was awarded the King George V Coronation (Scottish Police) Medal, 1911. 

 

On 20 September 1911, at Castlehill, Urquhart in the County of Elgin, William Thornton, Police Constable, (27), of 6 St Clair Street, Leith, married Jessie Isabella Douglas, (24), a Domestic Servant.  William’s parents were William Charles Henry Thornton, a Timekeeper at Paper Mills and his mother, Margaret Jane McMurray or Thornton, (Deceased). Jessie’s parents were John Douglas, a Farmer and Jessie Noble or Douglas. [ii]

 

On 6 June 1913, at 88 Dickson Place, Leith, William George Douglas Thornton was born. His father was William Thornton, a Police Constable and his mother, Jessie Isabella Douglas or Thornton.

 

From The Scotsman newspaper, Monday 29 May 1916, "LEITH - Bombardier William Thornton, R. G. A., killed, was a Reservist and was called up at the outbreak of war, when he had nine years' service with the Leith Police Force. He was 31 years of age, and leaves a widow and one child, who reside at 88 Dickson Street, Leith." [iii]

 

The records of the Commonwealth War Graves Commission show that Bombardier 18129 William Thornton, (31) of the Guards “Z” Trench Mortar Battery, Royal Garrison Artillery, died in Belgium on 18 May 1916. He is buried in the Menin Road South Military Cemetery, Plot I.O.7. He was the son of Serjt. Maj. And Margaret Thornton of Bolton, husband of Jessie Isabella Douglas Thornton of Craighurst, Craigellachie, Banffshire.[iv]

 

William Thornton’s British War and Victory Medals would have gone to his widow, Jessie.

10

Benjamin

Mundell

Benjamin was born in Bathgate, West Lothian on 12 March 1887. He joined LBP on 27 April 1907. 

 

From 14 July, 1915 to 20 February, 1919, Benjamin served as a Sergeant in the Royal Garrison Artillery. He was awarded the French Croix-de-Guerre, the General Service Medal (BWM), the King George V Coronation (Scottish Police) Medal, 1911, the King George VI Coronation Medal and the Defence Medal. 

 

He retired as a Sergeant in Edinburgh City Police on 17 June 1946.

11

Samuel

Montgomery

Samuel was born on 20 February 1882 in Bush, Co. Antrim in Ireland. He joined LBP on 25 February 1908, his previous occupation being ‘a Soldier in the Royal Garrison Artillery’ for 8 years. He was awarded the  King George V Coronation  (Scottish Police) Medal, 1911.

 

From 26 August, 1915 to 30 January, 1919, Samuel was a Sergeant in RGA. Wounded in action once. He was awarded the General Service Medal (BWM) and the Victory Medal.

 

Samuel retired from Edinburgh City Police on 24 February 1938 as a PC. 

12

Alexander

Robertson (Died)

Alexander was a PC living as a Boarder at 323 Leith Walk in the Census, 1911.  He was born around 1882 near Elgin, Elginshire. Awarded the King George V Coronation (Scottish Police) Medal, 1911.  

 

Possibly, Private No. 30256 Alexander Robertson, 15th Royal Scots, (34), 'Presumed Dead' on 30 July 1916 in France.  

13

Robert A 

Whyte (KIA)

Robert Alexander Whyte joined LBP in 1913.

 

The Montrose Standard of 15 October 1915 carried the following report, “Private R. Whyte, Cameron Highlanders, son of Mr R. Whyte, 38 Castle street, is reported killed between 25th and 28thSeptember last. Twenty-three years of age, the deceased was prior to joining Leith Police Force three years ago engaged as a Farm Servant at Commieston, near Montrose. He enlisted in April and has been at the front since June.” [v]

 

The Montrose Review of 18 July 1919 reported the names of War Dead from the town. Among them were: "September 25, 1915, Private R. Whyte, 1st Cameron Highlanders, son of Robert Whyte, 38 Castle Street, Montrose - Killed in France, twenty-three years of age, he enlisted in April 1915 and left for France in June. He was formerly a Constable in the Leith Police Force and was unmarried.[vi]

 

The Commonwealth War Graves Commission Records state that Robert Alexander Whyte, (23), the son of Robert and Jane Whyte, 100 Castle Street, Montrose was Private No. S/17703 of the 1st Battalion the Cameron Highlanders and was killed in action on 28 September 1915. He is buried in Ninth Avenue Cemetery, Haisnes, France, Grave reference, Sp. Mem. 28. [vii]

14

William

McKay

William McKay was born in Tongue, Sutherland on 16 June 1888 and joined LBP on 18 November 1909. He was awarded the King George V Coronation Scottish Police) Medal, 1911. 

 

He was in the army from 14 July, 1915 to 23 January, 1919, was a Sergeant in Labour Corps and awarded the Meritorious Service Medal, the General Service Medal and Victory Medal. 

 

He retired from Edinburgh City Police on 25 June 1945 as a PC and was entitled to the Defence Medal for his service in WW2.

 

15

James M

Bruce (KIA)

James McLeish Bruce, born 30 September 1886, was the son of David Strachan Bruce, a Gardener and Maggie McLeish or Bruce. They had been married in Redgorton, Perth in 1883. [viii]He was living as a Boarder in 24 Henderson Gardens, Leith in the Census of 1911 and was awarded the King George V Coronation (Scottish Police) Medal, 1911. 

 

The Commonwealth War Graves Commission Records for St Sever Cemetery, Rouen, France, Part 1, A- L, records the following:

“BRUCE, Lce. Cpl. James, S/12039. 2nd Bn. Gordon Highlanders. 3 July, 1916. Age 28. Only son of David and Margaret Bruce, of 23 Beresford Terrace, Ayr. A. 22. 11.”

 

James’ MIC states that he landed in France on 11 November 1915 and was thus entitled to the award of the 1914-15 Star, British War and Victory Medals, all of which, would have gone to his parents.

 

16

John

Halfpenny 

PC John Halfpenny born around 1890 in Gorebridge, Midlothian. He was living as a Boarder at 11 Gordon Street, Leith in 1911 and was awarded the King George V Coronation (Scottish Police) Medal, 1911. 

 

According to The Edinburgh Evening News of 7 December 1915, “Lance Corporal John Halfpenny, 1st Gordon Highlanders, is reported to have been wounded in France. He left Leith Police in June to enlist.” [ix]

 

Enlisted as Private No. S/10952, he disembarked in France on 2 October 1915. He also served in 10th Gordons as a Lance Sergeant. 

 

According to the Dalkeith Advertiser of 16 December 1915, “WOUNDED:- news to hand tells that another Gorebridge lad, Lance-Corpl. John Halfpenny, 1st Gordon Highlanders, has been severely wounded. A son of the late Mr Thomas Halfpenny, who was in his day, well known throughout the district, and nephew of the late Miss Halfpenny, Mullabrach House, he was a member of Leith Police Force previous to answering the call of King and country.” [x]

 

John transferred to Class Z Army Reserve on 30 March 1919. He was awarded the 1915 Star, the British War and Victory Medals. 

 

There is no record of him on 2 November 1920 when Leith Burgh Police became part of Edinburgh City Police.

17

John

McIntosh (No.1)

John McIntosh was born on 30 March 1887 in Kinlochbervie, Sutherland and joined LBP on 15 October 1910. His previous occupation was a Fisherman. 

 

He served 7 years in the Royal Naval Reserve on RN Mine Sweepers. He was awarded the General Service  Medal (BWM). 

 

John retired from Edinburgh City Police as a PC on 15 October 1940.

 

18

Alexander

Stirton

He was awarded the King George V Coronation (Scottish Police) Medal, 1911 but no trace in 1911 Census.

 

Possibly born in Orkney.  Too many possible ‘Stirton’ to positively identify the correct man

  

19

J

Stewart

There are 26 possible 'J Stewarts' in Leith in the 1911 Census. It is impossible to identify the correct one until the NRS reopens in Edinburgh. (GM 12 August 2020).

20

Alexander

McLeod (No.1 KIA)

Alexander was awarded the King George V Coronation (Scottish Police) Medal, 1911. Spelled Macleod on the Police Station War Memorial. The only other ‘Alexander McLeod’ recorded in LBP records did not join until 1914. It is likely that the young man below joined LBP after the Census of 1911.

 

The Scotsman newspaper of Saturday 9 August 1913, in an article concerning Dock Strikes in Leith, reports that "Alexander MacLeod, a Constable In Leith Police, was assaulted by a riotous mob of strikers by being butted and bitten on the left hand to the effusion of blood..." The accused was sentenced to three months imprisonment. [xi]

 

There is an Alexander McLeod (22, born around 1889) living with his widowed mother, Marion, wife Agnes and two daughters, Agnes, (2) and Marion, (1), in 11 Trafalgar Lane, Leith in the 1911 Census. His occupation was Labourer in a Paper Factory. 

 

This young man enlisted in the Seaforth Highlanders, No. (Seaforth) 9484, on 6 September 1906 and declared previous service in 5th Volunteer Battalion, Royal Scots. His next of kin were his father, Norman and his mother, Marion, both of 36 Trafalgar Lane, Leith. He served for 1 year and 23 days until 23 September 1907 when he was discharged from the 2ndBattalion. There is no reason given for the discharge.

 

The Return of Warrant Officers, Non-Commissioned Officers and Men of the Seaforth Highlanders records that:

“S/6903 – L/Cpl. 2nd Bn. – McLeod, Alexander, (26) – Born Scotland – was killed in action on 18 May 1915 at North East Ypres, Belgium”. [xii]

 

The Medal Roll for the 1914-15 Star of the Seaforth Highlanders records that “S/6903 L/Cpl. McLeod, Alexander, disembarked in France on 12 May 1915 and was later killed in action”. [xiii]

 

The Medal roll for British War and Victory Medals of the 2ndBattalion Seaforth Highlanders dated July 1920 records that, “S/6903L/Cpl. McLeod Alexander served” (with that unit). [xiv]

 

The Workers Union Record of August 1915 published a Roll of Honour listing members of the union who had lost their lives in the war. On page 10, under ‘Army’ is the following:

“Leith -  (1) L. Corpl. A. McLeod – Seaforth Highlanders – Killed in Action’. [xv]

21

John

Skea

He was awarded the King George V Coronation (Scottish Police) Medal, 1911 although N/T in Census 1911 as a PC. 

 

N/T. in Ancestry Army Records. 

 

It is possible he was a Deck Hand from Orkney in the RNVR and entitled to the British War and Victory Medals. It is also possible he served in the Army. There are too many possible options to positively identify the correct man.

 

22

J. W.

Davidson

The Edinburgh Evening News carried the following intimation on 26 May 1915: “DAVIDSON – Mrs Davidson and family wish to thank friends and neighbours, and also the members of Leith Police, for all their kind expressions of sympathy and floral tributes received in their recent sad bereavement. 16 Prince Regent Street, Leith.” [xvi]

 

James Davidson, (54) Police Constable, married to Margaret Cameron, died on 21 May 1915 at 16 Prince Regent Street, Leith. His widow registered his death. [xvii]

 

I can find no other record of a ‘PC J. Davidson’ in Leith between 1911 – 1920.

23

John

Liddle

John was born on 30 June 1879 in Leith, Midlothian and joined LBP on 9 June 1911 after service in the Seaforth Highlanders and in time to be awarded the King George V Coronation (Scottish Police) Medal. 

 

He served for 12 years  in the Seaforth Highlanders as No. 6612, Lance Corporal and was awarded the Queen's South Africa Medal,  with clasps, 'Cape Colony', 'Orange Free State', 'Transvaal', and the  King's South Africa Medal with clasps, 'South Africa - 1901', 'South Africa - 1902', for his service in the 2nd Boer War. He was awarded the General Service Medal (BWM) and Victory Medal for his service in WWI. 

 

He retired from Edinburgh City Police on 28 November 1938 as a Sergeant.

 

24

David J C 

Gibson

David James Clark Gibson was born 5 September 1892 and joined LBP on 21 November 1911.

 

He served in 7th Black Watch (Royal Highlanders) & Argyll & Sutherland Highlanders as Drum-Major between 14 July, 1915 and 6 March, 1919. He was awarded the General Service Medal (BWM)and Victory Medal. 

 

David retired from Edinburgh City Police on 31 May 1943 as a PC.

25

John

Paterson (KIA)

A report on the Leith Police Sports in the Scotsman of 1 August 1910, has John Paterson of L. P. A. A. C.  (Leith Police Amateur Athletics Club) being placed third (36’ 5”) in the ‘Putting the Ball’ so he should appear in the 1911 Census. [xviii]

So far, I have been unable to find him.

 

A report in the Edinburgh Evening News of 9 December 1915 states “GORDON HIGHLANDERS:- Lance-Corpl. John Paterson, 1st Gordon Highlanders, who left Leith Police to join the Army in  August last, has been wounded in France.”

 

Unfortunately, there are about 40 ‘John Paterson’ in the Service Returns between 1915 and 1918, 17 in 1915 alone so it impossible to identify which is the correct man.

26

M

O'Donnell

No trace in 1911 Census in Leith. 

 

No Trace in Ancestry/Findmypast Military records.

 

27

William

McDougall

William McDougall was born on 14 January 1892 in Manor, Peebles and joined LBP 3 June 1912.  

 

He served in the Army from 8 September, 1915 to 23 January, 1919 and was twice wounded. He was awarded the General Service Medal (BWM) and Victory Medal. 

 

William retired from Edinburgh City Police as a PC on 31 December 1945 and is entitled to the Defence Medal for his service in WW2.

28

Walter

Brydon

Walter was born in Carrington, Midlothian on 26 March 1892 and joined LBP 4 July, 1912 as a PC. 

 

He served in the Army between 7 July, 1915 and 20 February, 1919 and was awarded the General Service Medal (BWM) and Victory Medal. 

 

He retired from Edinburgh City Police on 31 December 1945 and was entitled to the award of the Defence Medal for his service during WW2.

29

William W

Ramsay

William Weighland Ramsay was born on 6 April 1891 in Newbattle, Midlothian and joined LBP on 8 July 1912. He served as a  Corporal in the Gordon Highlanders. 

 

A report in the West Lothian Courier of 31 May 1918 reported the following, “WINCHBURGH MAN A PRISONER OF WAR:- Mrs Ramsay, 11 Niddry Cottages, Winchburgh has received intimation that her husband, Corporal Wm. Ramsay, Gordons, previously reported missing, is now a prisoner of war in Germany. At time of enlisting, Cpl. Ramsay was a member of Leith Police Force. Mrs Ramsay also received  a letter of congratulation from the Divisional Major General, on her husband’s gallantry on 21 March 1918.”

 

William was awarded the Military Medal,  the 1914-15 Star, the General Service Medal (BWM) and Victory Medal. He was also awarded the King's Police Medal for Gallantry (1st January, 1925) for saving the life of a drowning man in Leith Docks. I Have picture of him in ECP uniform wearing all the medals in 1922. He retired from Edinburgh City Police on 8 July 1942 as a PC. 

30

Francis S

Eunson (KIA)

Francis Seater Eunson was born on 26 June 1889 in Surrigarth, Westray, Orkney. His parents were John Eunson and Tomina Seater or Eunson. 

 

He was Private No. S/12038 in the 8th/10th  Battalion Gordon Highlanders. 

 

Francis Eunson, (28), Private , S/12038, was killed in action in France or Belgium on 31 July 1917. There is no trace in the 1911 Census.

31

Joseph O

McDonald

Joseph Obedia McDonald was born on 31 August 1892 in South Leith, Midlothian and joined LBP 10 September 1912. 

 

He was a Sergeant in Seaforth Highlanders and served from 26 August, 1915 to 13 February, 1919. He entered France on 31 December, 1915 and his MIC confirms the award of the Military Medal, the 1914-15 Star, the General Service Medal (BWM), and Victory Medal. 

 

Joseph retired on 31 December 1945 as a Sergeant. He was also entitled to the award of five War Service chevrons and the Defence Medal for his time in WW2.

 

His picture as PS 22 A, Edinburgh City Police, can be seen above. He is wearing his Military Medal and the other medals described above. The picture was very kindly provided by his Great grandson, Ranald Macdonald.

 

32

William A

McCall

William Auld McCall was born on 4 March 1888 in Newington, Edinburgh and joined LBP in 1912. 

 

He joined the Army 17 July, 1915 to 7 August, 1919 and was awarded the General Service (BWM) and Victory Medals. 

 

He retired from Edinburgh City Police in 1944 as a Sergeant.

 

33

John

McIntosh (No.2)

John McIntosh was born on 18 October 1912 in Tongue, Sutherland and joined LBP on 18 October 1912. 

 

He served in Army from 28 July, 1915 to 9 January, 1919 and was awarded the General Service  Medal (BWM), the Victory Medal and King George VI Coronation Medal, 1937. 

 

He retired from Edinburgh City Police on 19 October 1942 as a PC.

 

34

James C

Beveridge

James Cunningham Beveridge was born on 25 June 1894 in Ballingry, Fife and joined LBP 19 March 1913. 

 

He served in the 6th Battalion King’s Own Scottish Borderers as Private No. 31380, from 9 July, 1917 and was awarded the British War Medal and Victory Medal for his service in France.

 

He rejoined LBP on 9 Jan, 1919 and resigned from Edinburgh City Police on 18 Nov, 1922. 

35

J

Talbot

No trace of a likely J. Talbot in Leith in Census of 1911 or in Ancestry military records.

36

Thomas

Fairfull

Thomas Fairfull was born in Beath, Fife on 2 August 1891 and joined LBP on 2 April 1913. 

 

Enlistment address, 12 Jamieson Place, Leith. Served in Scots Guards as Private No. 17421 between 7 June, 1915 and 23 January, 1919. General Service Medal (BWM), Victory Medal, and King George V  Silver Jubilee medal, 1935. 

 

Retired from Edinburgh City Police as a Sergeant on 2 May 1944. Probably entitled to the Defence Medal for his WW2 service.

 

37

George E

Bland

George Edward Bland was born 16 August 1882 at St Mary's, London and joined LBP on 19 April 1913. 

 

Previous occupation, Soldier, having served 10 years in the Royal Field Artillery. As a Reservist, he was called up on 5 August 1914 and served as a Corporal with BEF in France and Flanders. He was wounded twice and taken prisoner during the retreat from Mons and spent four years in a German Prisoner of War camp. 

 

He resumed with LBP on 23 January 1919. Entitled to Mons Star with Clasp and Rose (1914 Star), General Service Medal (BWM)and Victory Medal. 

 

George Bland was the artist who created the Memorial Scroll (shown above), that features the names of the 61 men of Leith Burgh Police and the Force Police Surgeon who served in the military during World War 1.

 

George Edward Bland retired from Edinburgh City Police as a PC on 25 August 1941.

 

38

Thomas

Bruce

Thomas Bruce was born on 30 October 1891 at Thurso, Caithness and joined LBP on 5 June, 1913. 

 

He was a Sergeant in the 5th Battn. Seaforth Highlanders (1 year 4 months) and awarded the Military Medal,  General Service Medal (BWM), and Victory Medal. 

 

He was also entitled to a Defence Medal for his service in WW2. He  retired from Edinburgh City Police on 2 April 1946 as a Sergeant.

 

39

Murdo

Henry

Murdo Henry was born on 28 October 1891 in Nigg, Ross-shire and joined LBP on 2 July 1913. 

 

He served in the Royal Highlanders (Black Watch) as Private S/13084 from 30 March, 1916 until 24 August 1918. He suffered a ‘severe gunshot wound (GSW) to his back’ and was unable to resume duty until 28 February, 1919 when his address was C/O Duff, 295 Easter Road, Leith.  He was awarded the General Service Medal (BWM) and Victory Medal. 

 

Murdo was still serving as a Sergeant in Edinburgh City Police when he died  in Queen Mary Nursing Home, Chalmers Street, Edinburgh on 19 February, 1940.

 

40

Thomas B

Latto (KIA)

Thomas Latto was 21 years and 100 days old when enlisted in the Scots Guards as Guardsman No. 10197 on 5 September 1914. Civilian Occupation, Police Constable, born Arniston, Midlothian. 

 

The Dalkeith Advertiser reported on 9 December 1915 under the heading, “FROM THE FRONT:- Private T. Latto, Scots Guards, one of the three soldier sons of Mr William Latto, Catcune Farm…home on the usual short holiday from the western Front this week…looking fit in spite of the hardships…have come through…was a member of the Leith Police Force…” 

 

Thomas was killed in action with the 1st Battalion in France on 15 September 1916. He also had at least one other brother serving in the Scots Guards. 

 

His father William, his next of kin, was living at Catcune Farm, Gorebridge, Midlothian. Thomas was awarded the 1914-15 Star, British War and Victory Medals which went to his sister, Jane Ross.

 

41

A J

Gunn

Possibly Alfred G. Gunn (25,  born around 1886 in England) living at 270 Bonnington Road, Leith as a Visitor in the Census 1911. 

 

No trace of any identifiable similar name in Ancestry, Scotlandspeople or Findmypast.

42

Angus

Cameron (KIA)

There are 14 Angus Camerons in the Service Returns of deaths between 1914 - 1918 and until the NRS opens up in Edinburgh, (Date 19 August 2020) it is impossible to try and identify which is correct online.

43

G

Hunter

There is no identifiable PC G Hunter in the Census in Leith in 1911. 

 

44

Christopher

Mackay

Christopher Mackay was born on 12 August 1894 in Tongue, Sutherland and joined LBP on 16 January 1914. 

 

In Army from 30 June, 1915 to 6 February, 1919. Served with Lovat Scouts, Seaforth Highlanders, No. 9221 and 1 Platoon, 1st Battalion the King’s Own Scottish Borderers, No.27440. He was wounded twice, on 23 July 1918 and again on 9 August the same year. Received serious gunshot wound (GSW) to his shoulder and in receipt of disability award. His next of kin was his father, Hugh Mackay, Melness, Tongue, Sutherland. Addresses shown as C/O Liddle, 213 Leith Walk and 16 Lower Granton Road, Leith. Christopher was awarded the 1914-15 Star, the British Wan and Victory Medals. 

 

He resigned from Edinburgh City Police on 19 October 1923 as a PC.

 

45

Hugh

Mackay

Hugh Mackay was born 29 August 1892 in the Parish of St George in Edinburgh and joined LBP 17 July 1914. Hugh had previous service of 13 months in Inverness County Constabulary . He was living at 17 Thorntree Street, Leith when he enlisted in the Cameron Highlanders in Edinburgh on  31 March, 1915. His next of kin was his mother, Mrs Dora Robertson of Station Cottage, Culloden Moor, by Inverness. His wife, Isabella McKay whom he married at Inverness on 14 December 1916, was also living with her mother in law. 

 

The Aberdeen Weekly Journal of 14 January 1916 reported the following, “INVERNESS CAMERON WOUNDED:- Lance-Corporal Hugh Mackay, 5th Cameron Highlanders, who was formerly a member of the Leith Police Force, has been wounded in France. His home residence is in Inverness.”

 

He was a Lance Sergeant on his discharge on  12 June, 1919. He resigned from Edinburgh City Police as a PC on 14 February, 1924. He is entitled to a 1914-15 Star, British War and Victory Medals, but his Army record is partially burnt and there is no trace of his Army Number to confirm he is S/17702 Sergeant Hugh Mackay.

 

46

Thomas A

Hunter

Thomas Adam Hunter was born at Tingwall, Shetland on 13 January 1890 and joined LBP on 23 March 1914. 

 

According to his police personnel record, he served in the 7thBattalion the Gordon Highlanders (Volunteers) from 5 September, 1915 to 6 March, 1919. There are several ‘Thomas Adam Hunter’ entitled to war medals with the Gordons, the Argyll’s and the Lovat Scouts. It is impossible to identify the correct man from the number available. 

 

Thomas resigned as A PC from Edinburgh City Police on 18 July, 1930.

 

47

J W

Somerville

The only J. W. Somerville in Leith in 1911 is a 37-year-old Carter living at the Corporation Lodging House in Parliament Street, Leith. Unable to check out all the possible options online. (GM 19 August 2020).

 

48

William

Pollock

William Pollock was born on 2 December 1885 in Renfrew, Renfrewshire and joined LBP on 30 March 1914, having previously been in the Scots Guards for seven years from 29 April 1907, at home in the UK, and in Egypt. His Army No. was 6733. 

 

As an Army Reservist, he was ‘Called to the Colours’ on 5 August 1914 and served in the 1st Battalion Scots Guards, from then until 19 November 1918 when he resumed his police career. His final rank was Acting Company Quarter Master Sergeant. He had served with the British Expeditionary Force in France, was wounded in action (gunshot wound to his face) on 31 July 1917 and was entitled to the 1914 (Mons) Star, Clasp and Roses, the British War and Victory Medals. He married Elizabeth Wallis on 3 February 1916 in Sidcup, Kent and during the war, she was living at 56 Princes Gate, London. William’s discharge address was 31 Offord Road, Sidcup, Kent until 24 October 1918, from when it would be, C/O Duff, 295 Easter Road, Leith. His Army character was “Exemplary”. He was living at 18 St Clair Street, Leith in 1938 when he applied to become a member of the ‘Old Contemptables Association’. 

 

William retired from Edinburgh City Police as a PC on 31 December 1945 and was entitled to the Defence Medal for his service in WW2.

 

49

James M

Todd (KIA)

The Arbroath Guide of 21 October 1916 reported the following, “DEATH OF A GORDON HIGHLANDER:- Mr James Todd, Cross Roads, Kinnell, has received word that his son, Private James Todd, Gordon Highlanders, died of wounds on 16th inst. In France, being severely wounded in the arm and hip. He enlisted about a year ago. Previous to enlistment, he was a member of Leith Police Force. He was 25 years of age.”

 

James M Todd, Private No. S/12867, of the 8th/10th Battalion Gordon Highlanders,  (26), Died of wounds in Rouen, France on 16 October 1916. James’ British War and Victory Medals would have gone to his father.

50

Donald H

Goodsir

Donald Harrold Goodsir was born on 6 November 1890 in the Parish of South Ronaldsay and Burray in Orkney and joined LBP on 18 June 1914. 

 

He joined the Household Battalion, as Trooper No. 3165  on 7 June, 1917 but transferred to the Scots Guards as Guardsman No. 17261 and served until 31 January, 1919. His mother, Robina Harrold Goodsir, was listed as his next of kin. He is entitled to the General Service Medal (BWM) and Victory Medal.  

 

Donald retired from Edinburgh City Police on  1945 as a PC and is also entitled to the Defence Medal for his service during WW2.

 

51

William R

Laing (Died)

There are 18 possible 'William R Laing' in the NRS Service and Marine Returns of deaths between 1914 and 1919. It is impossible to identify which is correct while the NRS in Edinburgh is closed. (GM 19 August 2020).

52

George L

Clapperton (KIA)

Enlisted in Scots Guards as Guardsman No. 14404. Killed in action in France or Belgium on 31 July 1917. 

 

The Midlothian Journal of Friday 24 August 1917 reported that: "PENICUIK MAN KILLED IN ACTION: Last week, Mr and Mrs George Clapperton, Pike, Pencuik, received official notification of the death of their third eldest of four soldier sons, Private George Clapperton, Scots Guards. The news of his death in action had some ten days previously filtered through from the front in a letter from a Leith chum, and later in a letter from a Penicuik man serving in the same regiment. Private Clapperton who was 22 years of age, was for some time employed as a railway surface man of the Peebles Branch, and at the time of his enlistment he was serving in the Leith Police Force. He had been ten months at the front. He was the grandson of the late Mr James Clapperton, Maybank, whose family have tenanted the farm for the last 127 years." 

53

James

Low

There was a PC John Low, collar number 606, born on 20 January 1873 at Tannadice, Angus, who joined LBP on 4 December 1896. There is no mention of Military service in his personnel file. He retired from Edinburgh City Police on 7 December 1926 and I think it unlikely that he is the correct 'J. Low'.

 

According to the Montrose, Arbroath and Brechin Review & Kincardineshire Advertiser of 16 August, 1918, “MONTROSE BROTHERS – ONE WOUNDED, THE OTHER A PRISONER:- Mr James Low, Pugeston, Montrose, has received intimation that his son, Private Frank Low, Seaforth Highlanders, has been wounded on the left arm , and is in hospital in France. This is the third time he has been wounded. He enlisted three years ago and was formerly a porter at Bridge of Dun Station. Another son, Private James Low, 1st Black watch, was taken a prisoner of war in April. Before enlisting, he was in the Leith Police Force.”

 

There are at least 15 possible ‘James Low’ in the Black Watch (Royal Highlanders). There is no James Low in LBP in November 1920.

54

George E G

Mackay

Private No. S/12307 George Evan Grant Mackay enlisted on 14 July 1915 in the  14th Battalion Argyll & Sutherland Highlanders. His civilian occupation was listed as a Policeman of  303 Leith Walk, Leith. He was 25 years and 246 days old. 

 

He had previous service in the 4th Battalion Seaforth Highlanders but was discharged in 1911, probably on joining Leith Burgh Police. Served twice in France and Belgium suffering a gunshot wound (GSW) (identified as a machine gun bullet) to his left knee on 23 November 1917. He was evacuated to the United Kingdom and admitted to the Queen Mary's Military Hospital in Whalley, Lancashire. He finished the war as a Private in the Labour Corps, No. 642569. He was awarded the British War and Victory Medals. He was discharged on 16 May 1919 to his home address at Killay Farm, Avoch, Rosshire.

 

There is no trace of George Mackay in the roll of officers on 2 November 1920.

55

Alexander

Laing (KIA)

The Midlothian Journal of 18 December 1914 carried the following report: “SIR GEORGE McCRAE’S BATTALION: On Tuesday forenoon 40 young men left Penicuik in a special motor bus to join Sir George McCrae’s Battalion at its initial parade. At a social meeting on Monday night, one of the number, Mr Andrew McNulty, who is a member of Penicuik School Board, said, as a Socialist, he was opposed to war. He had not departed from his principles, but he had enlisted because  the nation at this time was fighting for its very existence.

 

Other members of the contingent included Mr Andrew Henderson, late of Penicuik Juniors and Falkirk F.C.; Mr Thos. H Young, secretary of Penicuik Cricket Club; Mr Alex. Laing and Mr. W. Inglis, late Leith Police force. The men were given a present of tobacco from shopkeeper friends before leaving Penicuik. Provost Chisholm accompanied the men, and they had a hearty send off from the townsfolk.”[xix]

 

Alexander joined 16th (McCrae's) Battalion Royal Scots on  19 December 1914 as Private No. 19535. His address at the time was 67 Lorne Street, Leith. He was 20 years and 2 months old. His next of kin was Elizabeth Stewart or Laing of 79 John Street, Penicuik, Midlothian. 

 

He arrived to join the BEF in France on 8 January 1916 as a qualified Machine Gunner. He was 'killed in action' on 1 July 1916, the first day of the Battle of the Somme. He completed 1 year and 21 days service, including the day he was killed. His next of kin would have received his British War and Victory Medals. 

 

His father, Alexander wrote to the Army Officer of Records, received by them, on 20 July, 1916, from 79 John Street, Penicuik as follows: 

 

"Sir, could you give me any information of our two sons, They are in the 16th Battn. Royal Scots and we have heard nothing from them since they were in action on the first of July. There was word came from other lads that they were both wounded but we have got no word since either one way or another. If you can give us any information, we will be very thankful to you. Their name and numbers are: 19536 L/Corpl. J Laing - 19535 Pte. A Laing. Please do your best for us and we will be very grateful. Yours, Alexander Laing" 

 

There is also an Army receipt dated 28 June 1922 in which Alexander Laing (senior) signs for receipt of his son’s British War and Victory Medals. 

 

According to a report in the Scotsman of 31 October 1919, “THE ROLL OF HONOUR:- Lance Corporal John Laing, 16th Royal Scots (McCrae’s Battalion) is now officially presumed to have died on 1st July 1916. The deceased soldier along with his brother Alexander (a member of Leith Police force), enlisted in the same battalion in December 1914, and both were reported missing on the same date…”[xx]

56

Donald

Munro

Donald Munro was born on 26 August 1892 at Farr, Sutherland and joined LBP on 1 September 1914. 

 

From 7 June, 1917 to 16 January, 1919, he served first in the Household Battalion, Trooper No. 3168 and later as No. 17174,  Corporal and Drill Instructor with the Scots Guards. When he enlisted, his address was C/O McKay, 1 Waverley Place, Leith. His mother, Isabella Mackay Munro of Leckvuirn, Bettyhill, By Thurso,  was shown as his next of kin 

 

His Scots Guards record shows that he served from 7 June 1917 to 17 June, 1919 at home, so he had no entitlement to the award of any medals. 

 

Donald retired from Edinburgh City Police on 11 December 1944 as a PC. He is probably entitled to the Defence Medal for his service during WW2.

57

Alexander

McLeod (No.2)

Alexander Gray Duguid McLeod was born in Cruden, Aberdeenshire on 17 February 1890 and joined LBP on 14 September 1914. 

 

He served first in the Household Battalion, Trooper No. 3167,  and then the Scots Guards, No. 17173, (Lance Corporal) between 7 June, 1917 and 30 January, 1919. He spent some time in the 3rd Northern General Hospital in Sheffield as a result of injury. In his attestment record, his occupation was ‘Police Constable in Leith’ and his next of kin was his father, Kenneth McLeod of 6 Windmill Street, Peterhead. He was awarded the General Service Medal (BWM)and Victory Medal for WWI and the Defence Medal for his service in WW2. 

 

He retired from Edinburgh City Police as a PC on 17 November 1947.

 

58

Walter

Inglis (KIA)

The Midlothian Journal of 18 December 1914 carried the following report: “SIR GEORGE McCRAE’S BATTALION: On Tuesday forenoon 40 young men left Penicuik in a special motor bus to join Sir George McCrae’s Battalion at its initial parade. At a social meeting on Monday night, one of the number, Mr Andrew McNulty, who is a member of Penicuik School Board, said, as a Socialist, he was opposed to war. He had not departed from his principles, but he had enlisted because  the nation at this time was fighting for its very existence.

 

Other members of the contingent included Mr Andrew Henderson, late of Penicuik Juniors and Falkirk F.C.; Mr Thos. H Young, secretary of Penicuik Cricket Club; Mr Alex. Laing and Mr. W. Inglis, late Leith Police force. The men were given a present of tobacco from shopkeeper friends before leaving Penicuik. Provost Chisholm accompanied the men, and they had a hearty send off from the townsfolk.”[xxi]

 

Walter enlisted in 16th (McCrae's) Battalion Royal Scots on 19 December 1914 as Private No. 19514. His address at the time was C/O Mrs Robertson, 67 Lorne Street, Leith. His next of kin was Mary Harper or Inglis, his mother. She later moved to Sunny braes, Kellernie Farm, Saline in Fife. He was born in Legerwood, Earlston, Berwickshire. He was 19 years and 7 months old. 

 

He arrived to join the BEF in France on 8 January 1916. He was 'killed in action' on 1 July 1916, the first day of the Battle of the Somme. he completed 1 year and 21 days service, including the day he was killed. His next of kin would have received his British War and Victory Medals.

 

See also PC Alexander Laing above.

59

Robert D

Carrie

Robert Douglas Carrie was born on 30 April 1890 in Elmwood Terrace, Lochend, Leith and joined LBP on 12 October 1914 with the Collar Number 24. 

 

He served 2 years, first as Trooper 3162 in Household Battalion and then as Private 17296 in 1st Bttn. Scots Guards in France & Belgium. He was entitled to British War and Victory Medal for his service in WWI. Robert rejoined LBP on 10 April 1919. 

 

Robert was awarded the King's Police Medal for Gallantry for saving the life of a drowning man in Leith Docks in the Blackout of 1940. He was also awarded the Defence Medal for his service during WW2. 

 

Robert Carrie retired from Edinburgh City Police on 1 April 1946 as a PC. He died on 2 May 1954 in Leith. I have a picture of him in ECP uniform. 

60

Robert

Stenhouse (KIA)

Robert Stenhouse was living C/O Ritchie, 7 Sloan Street, Leith and was a Police Constable when he joined the Household Battalion on 2 March 1916, as Trooper No. 3171. His father, Adam Stenhouse is listed as his next of kin. 

 

He was transferred to the Scots Guards, as Guardsman No. 17238, on 25 January 1918. 

 

Robert Stenhouse was ‘killed in action’ on 3 August 1918. He is buried in Berles New Military Cemetery, France, Grave reference 11.E.3. Aged 23 at death. Son of Adam and Mary Stenhouse of 87 Appin Crescent, Dunfermline, Fife. Berles-au-Bois is about 8 miles south west of Arras. His family were informed of his death on 15 August 1918. 

 

In a letter from the Army to Adam Stenhouse dated 6 January 1919, his father received the personal effects of his son, ‘photos, post card, wallet, hymn book, case, mirror badge, wrist watch and strap’.  Robert listed his sister, Janet Stenhouse, same address in Fife, as a dependent and she was awarded his Gratuity. The British War and Victory Medals to which Robert was entitled for his war service, would also have gone to his family.

61

Andrew

Johnston

Andrew Johnston was born on 21 December 1894 in Whitekirk, Haddington and joined LBP on 1 June 1915. 

 

He joined the Household Battalion as Trooper No. 3529 on 15 August 1917. He was later transferred to the Scots Guards as Guardsman No. 17373 and served until 30 January, 1919. His service in France entitled him to the award of the General Service (BWM) and Victory Medals. 

 

He retired from Edinburgh City Police on 21 July 1947 as a PC. His service in WW2 also entitled him to the award of the Defence Medal. 

 

62

Thomas M

Baillie

Thomas Mitchell Baillie was born in Airlie, Forfar on 3 September 1892 and joined LBP on 8 January 1915. 

 

He had previous service in Kinross shire Constabulary. His address was C/O Petrie, 6 Jamieson Place, Leith and his occupation Police Constable, when he enlisted in the Household Battalion as Trooper No. 3161 on 28 May 1917. His mother, Mrs Julia Baillie of Myrtle Cottage, Northmuir, Kirriemuir, was his next of kin. 

 

He was later transferred to the Scots Guards as Guardsman No. 17249. For his service with the 2nd Battalion in France, Thomas was entitled to the award of the British War and Victory Medals.  

 

Thomas retired from Edinburgh City Police as an Inspector on 24 September 1945 and was entitled to the award of the Defence Medal for his service in WW2.

 

[i]Ancestry.com

[ii]National Records of Scotland, (Statutory Marriages 144/1 5).

[iii]The Scotsman, Monday 29 May 1916.

[iv]Findmypast.co.uk, CWGC Records.

[v]The Montrose Standard, 15 October 1915.

[vi]The Montrose Review, 18 July 1919.

[vii]Findmypast.co.uk, CWGC Records.

[viii]National Records of Scotland, (Statutory Registers, Births, 692/1 621).

[ix]The Edinburgh Evening News, 7 December 1915.

[x]The Dalkeith Advertiser, 16 December 1915

[xi]The Scotsman, Saturday 9 August 1913.

[xii]National Records of Scotland, 1915 MCLEOD, Alexander, (Statutory Registers Deaths 127/AF 145).

[xiii]Ancestry.com Service Medal & Award Rolls, WO 329.

[xiv]Findmypast.com 

[xv]Findmypast.co.uk, Modern records centre, MSS.126/WU/4/2/1 (August 1915).

[xvi]The Edinburgh Evening News, 26 May 1916, page 3.

[xvii]National Records of Scotland, (1915, 692/1 198 Leith North).

[xviii]The Scotsman, 1 August 1910.

[xix]The Midlothian Journal, 18 December 1914.

[xx]The Midlothian Journal, 31 October 1919.

[xxi]The Midlothian Journal, 18 December 1914.

(Roll No. 29) PC William Weighland Ramsay KPM MM in 1929 with Edinburgh City Police. The top four medals are the Military Medal, the British War Medal and the Victory Medal. the lower medal is the King's Police Medal for Gallantry.
(Roll No. 59) PC Robert Douglas Carrie in 1940. He is wearing the British War Medal and the Victory Medal. He is about to be awarded the King's Police Medal for Gallantry.

STOP PRESS See one of only two 'Visit to Scotland' 1903 medals issued to a Metropolitan Police Officer - DS David Liddle

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