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Edinburgh City Police - PC 517D John James McKenzie McCartney

Edinburgh City Police

PC 517 D John James McKenzie McCartney

 

1914 Star 

British War Medal

Victory Medal

Defence Medal

 

Introduction

John McCartney was born in the Parish of Kilmore and Kilbride in the County of Argyll on 22 December 1894. His father was Thomas McCartney, a Gardener and his mother, Marion McKenzie or McCartney. They were married in Maryhill,  near Glasgow, on 2 November  1887.

 

John was a Carter when he enlisted in the Scots Guards on 14 July 1913 and was posted to the Foot Guards Depot at Caterham Barracks in Surrey on 22 July. He joined the 1st Battalion on completion of training and on 4 August 1914, was mobilised for departure to France with the 1st Division as part of the British Expeditionary Force (BEF).

 

The 1st Scots Guards landed at Le Havre on 14 August 1914 and were quickly in action at the Battle of Mons, the Retreat from Mons and the Battle of Etreux. The battalion was also involved in the Battles of Marne 1914, Aisne 1914 and Ypres 1914. It was during the last action during Ypres, the Battle of Gheluvelt, that John McCartney and 580 others were wounded or missing, presumed dead or captured and a further 105 killed. John was first imprisoned in Schneidemuhl and finally at Friedrichsfeld before his repatriation in late 1918.

 

On 25 March 1919, he joined Edinburgh City Police as PC 517D and posted to the West End Police Station.

 

John James McKenzie McCartney died in Edinburgh in 1945. 

 

What follows is a chronological history of his family extracted from public records. It is not unusual to find spelling and other anomalies in the records from year to year. In the interests of accuracy, I have transcribed them as they are. 

 

PC 517D McCartney in 1921 outside the rear of the West End Police Station, then DHQ. He is on the right on the rear row. He is wearing the ribbons of his 1914 Star, British War and Victory Medals.
PC McCartney's 1914 Star, British War Medal and Victory Medal for service in 1st Battalion Scots Guards and the Defence Medal for his Police Service in Edinburgh in World War 2.
The naming on PC McCartney's British War and Victory Medals.

The Early Years

 

Register of Births in the Parish of Muckhart in the County of Perth, 1859

Thomas McCartney was born in the Royal Hotel, Muckhart, Perthshire on 18 January 1859. His father was James McCartney, a Farmer and Horse Dealer and his mother, Ann Boddie or McCartney. His birth was registered by his father.

 

This is the birth of John McCartney’s father.

 

Census of Scotland 1861

Living at Penifiler, Portree, Isle of Skye in the County of Inverness on the night of the Census 1871 were the following:

 

Name & Age

Occupation

Place & County of Birth

Roderick McKenzie, (79)

Farmer of 3 acres

Snizort, Inverness-shire

Kenneth McKenzie, (38)

Son, Carpenter

Portree, Inverness-shire

John McKenzie, (32)

Son, spouse of Margaret McKenzie, Fisherman

Portree, Inverness-shire

Margaret McKenzie, (28)

Daughter-in-law, Fisherman’s wife

Duirinish, Inverness-shire

Catherine McKenzie, (4)

Grand daughter

Portree, Inverness-shire

Marion McKenzie, (2)

Grand daughter

Portree, Inverness-shire

 

Roderick is the future Great grandfather of John. John and Margaret are his future Grandparents and Marion is his future mother.

 

Census of Scotland 1871

Living at 3 Heatherfield,  Portree, Isle of Skye, in the County of Inverness, a few miles south of Penifiler, on the night of the Census 1871 were the following:

 

Name & Age

Occupation

Place & County of Birth

John McKenzie, (40)

Crofter

Portree, Inverness-shire

Margaret McKenzie, (36)

Crofter’s Wife

Snizort, Inverness-shire

Catherine McKenzie, (14)

Crofter’s daughter

Portree, Inverness-shire

Marion McKenzie, (12)

Crofter’s daughter

Portree, Inverness-shire

John McKenzie, (9)

Scholar

Portree, Inverness-shire

Isabella McKenzie, (6)

Scholar

Portree, Inverness-shire

Mary McKenzie, (3 months)

Crofter’s daughter

Portree, Inverness-shire

 

Register of Births in the District of Portree in the County of Inverness, 1878

Roderick McKenzie was born at Heatherfield, Portree on 5 August 1878. His mother, Marion McKenzie, a Domestic Servant, registered his birth.

 

Census of Scotland 1881

Living at 3 Heatherfield,  Portree, Isle of Skye, in the County of Inverness, a few miles south of Penifiler, on the night of the Census 1881 were the following:

 

Name & Age

Occupation

Place & County of Birth

John McKenzie, (50)

Crofter

Portree, Inverness-shire

Margaret McKenzie, (50)

Fisherman’s Wife

Snizort, Inverness-shire

Marion McKenzie, (21)

Fisherman’s daughter

Portree, Inverness-shire

John McKenzie, 18)

Boat Builder’s Apprentice

Portree, Inverness-shire

Isabella McKenzie, (15)

General servant

Portree, Inverness-shire

Mary McKenzie, (19)

Crofter’s daughter

Portree, Inverness-shire

Roderick Levy, (2)

Grandson

Portree, Inverness-shire

 

Roderick Levy was registered as Roderick McKenzie at his birth.

 

Register of Marriages in the District of Maryhill in the County of Lanarkshire 1887

On 24 November 1887, at 25 Balmore Street, Possilpark, Glasgow, in the County of Lanark, Thomas McCartney, (30), a Gardener of 38 Mansion Street, Possilpark, married Marion McKenzie, (24), a Domestic Servant of 25 Balmore Street, Possilpark.

 

Thomas’ parents were James McCartney, Horse Seller (Deceased) and Ann Reid or McCartney. Marion’s parents were John McKenzie, Chemical Works Foreman and Margaret McNab or McKenzie.

 

This is the marriage of John James McKenzie (J.J.M.) McCartney’s parents.

 

Register of Births in the District of Maryhill in the County of Lanarkshire 1888

David McCartney was born on 27 December 1887 at 49 Bardowie Street, Possilpark. His parents were Thomas and Marion McCartney. His mother registered his birth in January 1888.

 

Register of Deaths in the District of Portree in County of Inverness 1889

Roderick McKenzie, (11), died on 15 April 1889 at Heatherfield, Portree. His uncle, John McKenzie was present at and registered his death. This the death of Marion’s first child.

 

Census of Scotland 1891

Living at Bayton Terrace, off Granton Road, Leith, on the night of the Census 1891 were the following:

 

Name & Age

Occupation

Place & County of Birth

Thomas McCartney, (32)

Gardener

Muckhart, Perthshire

Marion McCartney, (28)

Wife

Heatherfield, Inverness

David McCartney, (3)

Son

Maryhill, Glasgow

William Bishop, (28)

Railway Porter/Boarder

Uphall, Linlithgow

 

Register of Births in the District of Kilmore & Kilbride in the County of Argyll 1895

John James McCartney was born on 22 December 1894 at Gallanach Lodge (near Oban) in Argyllshire. His parents were Thomas and Marion McCartney and his father registered his birth in January 1895.

 

Register of Births in the District of St George in the City of Edinburgh 1898

Katherine George Harkness was born on 23 August 1898 at 14 Freer Street, Fountainbridge, Edinburgh. Her parents were James Harkness, a Labourer and Margaret Alicia Russell or Harkness. Her parents had been married in Edinburgh on 26 November 1897.

 

This is the birth of J.J.M McCartney’s future wife.

 

Census of Scotland 1901

Living at Gallanach Lodge, Kilmore and Kilbride, Argyllshire, on the night of the Census 1901 were the following:

 

Name & Age

Occupation

Place & County of Birth

Thomas McCartney, (42)

Gardener

Muckhart, Perthshire

Marion McCartney, (38)

Wife

Heatherfield, Inverness

David McCartney, (13)

Son/Scholar

Maryhill, Glasgow

John J McCartney, (5)

Son/Scholar

Kilmore & Kilbride, Argyll

Thomas McCartney, (3)

Son

Kilmore & Kilbride, Argyll

 

 

Census of Scotland 1911

Living in a flat at 34 Roseburn Street, Edinburgh, on the night of the Census 1911 were the following:

 

Name & Age

Occupation

Place & County of Birth

Thomas McCartney, (53)

Gardener

Muckhart, Perthshire

Marion McCartney, (47)

Wife

Heatherfield, Inverness

Thomas McCartney, (14)

Son

Kilmore & Kilbride, Argyll

Donaldall Beaton, (22)

Nurseryman’s Clerk/Boarder

Glenmore, Inverness

 

Marian recorded that she and Thomas had been married for 24 years, had four live children together, only three of whom were still alive at the date of the Census in 1911. I believe the deceased child to be Roderick who died in 1889.

 

I can find no trace of John James McKenzie McCartney in Scotland for the 1911 Census. The next record for him is in 1913 in the Scots Guards Service Records.

Scots Guards Service Records

This document records that John James McCartney, 18 years and 7 months old, enlisted in the Scots Guards at Edinburgh on 14 July 1913 and was allocated the Service Number 8658. His previous occupation was given as ‘Carter’ and he had been born in the Parish of Kilmore near the Town of Oban in the County of Argyll. His engagement was for ‘3 years with the Colours and 9 years in the Reserve’. He was described as just under 5’ 9”, 136lbs ,with a fresh complexion, with dark brown hair. His religion was noted as ‘Presbyterian’.

 

Captain J Richmond, Royal Army Medical Corps (RAMC) passed him fit for the Army at Edinburgh on 14 July 1913.

 

Military History Sheet

The Military History Sheet (MHS) records where he served as a soldier and other important details of his life and career.

 

An important entry is that regarding his next of kin which lists his family, Father, Thomas, Mother, Marion, Brothers, David (elder) and Thomas, (younger), all living variously at 34 Roseburn Street, Murrayfield, Edinburgh or at 8 Campbell Street, Murrayfield.

 

The MIS also records that he was discharged on 11 February 1919 as “No longer physically fit for war service.

 

The following table records his service.

 

Service at Home and Abroad

Country

From 

To

Years

Days

Home

14.7.13

12.8.14

1

30

France &

13.8.14

 

 

 

Germany as POW

13.8.14*

26.11.18

4

106

Home

27.11.18

11.2.19

 

77

 

 

Total

5

213

 

His service at ‘Home’ includes his basic training which took place at the Guards Depot, Caterham in Surrey. He arrived at Caterham on 22 July 1913 and was posted to the 1st Battalion Scots Guards on 22 December 1913.

 

More information on the depot can be found at: https://theguardsdepot.co.uk/the-history-of-the-guards-depot-caterham/

 

* This date is inaccurate as it implies that John McCartney was captured on his first day in France. That is simply not true. Another section of the MIS records that he was “Reported Missing on 29 October 1914 as ‘Taken Prisoner of War by Germans’”.

 

1st Scots Guards in the British Expeditionary Force to France and Belgium 1914

The 1st Battalion Scots Guards landed with the British Expeditionary Force (BEF) in France on  14 August 1914 and thereafter took part in every major battle of that year. Their Battle Honours are ‘Retreat from Mons’, ‘Marne, 1914’, ‘Aisne, 1914’  and ‘Ypres, 1914’.

 

According to the Regimental History, the battle of most significance to the battalion was Ypres. In the four weeks of that battle from 18 October, the deaths recorded, plus the wounded and missing or captured as prisoners of war there, exceeded the total number of Scots Guardsmen who died in each of the years 1917 and 1918. At the end of the battle, the battalion only had one Captain and seventy-three men left.

 

A transcription of the 1st Scots Guards War Diary from 4 August to 17 November 1914 can be found at the bottom of this page by scrolling down.

 

Guardsman John James McKenzie McCartney was one of those wounded and captured in the action at Geluveld east of Ypres of 29 October 1914. He spent the next four years and one month in German prisoner of war camps at Schneidemuhl (present day Pola in Poland but then in German Silesia) and Friedrichsfeld in Germany, 60 miles north of Koln near Wesel. Friedrichsfeld housed prisoners in long timber barracks with the first POW’s in 1914 provided the labour to build them. His POW number was 62869. He was repatriated to the United Kingdom on 27 November 1918 and was diagnosed to be suffering from ‘Nervous Debility’. He was awarded a 20% Disability Pension from the Army.

 

Army Form W 12694 – 2378

This form records that after his capture at Ypres on 29 October 1914, John McCartney was held at a Prisoner of War Camp at Schneidemuhl in Germany. His final place of internment was at Friedrichsfeld in Germany.

 

He was finally repatriated to the United Kingdom on 27 November 1918.

 

Medals, Decorations & Annuities

This section records his entitlement to the 1914 Star, British War Medal and the Victory Medal, all of which can be seen below. A King’s Certificate, No. 1340, was issued on 14 March 1919 in recognition of his Disability Pension award.

 

Medal Rolls of the Scots Guards 1918 - 1920

A medal roll for the 1914 Star, compiled by the Scots Guards Record Office at Buckingham Gate, London on 31 January 1918, records that ‘8658 Private McCartney, John James McKenzie’, who disembarked in France on ‘13/8/14’ and was a ‘Prisoner of War’ was entitled to the award of the medal which was sent to him by post on 5 February 1919.

 

The medal roll for the Victory Medal and British War Medal, compiled by the Scots Guards Record Office at Buckingham Gate, London on 29 March 1920, records that ‘8658 Private McCartney, John J. McK. No. 8658 PTE. 1SG’, was entitled to the award of the medals.

 

Receipt of the 1914 Star, British War Medal & Victory Medals

A form dated 6 February 1919 records John McCartney’s receipt of the 1914 Star. A signature on Army Form W3553 dated 19 March 1919, also records his receipt of King’s Certificate No. 1340. John’s Army record also contains a receipt, Army Form B. 5112,  he signed on 17 September 1921 for his British War Medal and Victory Medal. 

 

John was also entitled to Silver War Badge No. 520545 issued on 11 February 1921.

 

Ministry of Pensions Letter

This document confirms that Guardsman 8658 John McCartney, then of the 3rd Reserve Battalion, was entitled to a 20% War Disability pension on the grounds of ‘Nervous Debility’. He was 24 years of age and residing at 34 Roseburn Street, Edinburgh.

 

Character Certificate

There is no date on this document, but it might be that this is the reference that was provided by the Scots Guards to Edinburgh City Police when John McCartney applied to become a Police Constable. The document, signed by two Scots Guards officers, records that 8658 Guardsman McCartney J., was “ Clean, honest, sober and industrious, tactful, intelligent and discreet and is worthy of implicit trust”.

PC 517D John McCartney in 1921 wearing the ribbons of his 1914 Star, British War and Victory Medals . The picture was taken at the rear of the West End Police Station in Torphichen Lane which was then DHQ.

Edinburgh City Police

John James McKenzie McCartney joined Edinburgh City Police as a Constable  on 25 March 1919. He was posted to the West End Police Station, then ‘D’ Division, as PC 517D.

 

His Police personnel file also records his service in the Scots Guards as ‘5 years and 213 days’ and his entitlement to the 1914 Star, British War and Victory Medals.

 

Register of Marriages in the District of George Square in the City of Edinburgh 1921

On 8 October 1921, at 19 Chalmers Street, Edinburgh after Banns according to the Forms of the Established Church of Scotland, John McKenzie McCartney, (25), a Police Constable of 34 Roseburn Street, Edinburgh, married Catherine George Harkness, (23), a Biscuit Factory Checker, of 5 Victoria Street, Edinburgh. The witnesses were Annie Hendry and David McCartney and the ceremony was performed by the Reverend William Lindsay of the Chalmers Memorial Church.

 

John’s parents were Thomas McCartney, a Gardener and Marion McKenzie or McCartney and Catherine’s, James Harkness, an Engineer and Margaret Alicia Lees or George.

 

Punishments , Reductions Etc

There are only two entries under this section, and they are not unusual for a disciplined force of that time. 

 

The first is dated 18 April 1929 and records that PC McCartney was ‘ Fined 10/- (£0.50) for being absent from his fixed point, gossiping and idling his time from 1.50 to 2.00pm on 12 April, 1929.

 

Register of Deaths in the District of Haymarket in the City of Edinburgh 1934

Marion McCartney, (75), married to Thomas McCartney, Gardener (Retired), died on 14 April 1934 at 44 Coltbridge Avenue, Murrayfield, Edinburgh. Her death was registered by her husband, Thomas McCartney.

 

Register of Deaths in the District of Haymarket in the City of Edinburgh 1937

Thomas McCartney, (78), Gardener, Widower of Marion McCartney, died on 30 January 1937 at, 44 Coltbridge Avenue, Murrayfield, Edinburgh. His death was registered by his son John McCartney of 54 Bread Street, Edinburgh.

 

Punishments , Reductions Etc

The second and final entry under this heading is dated 18 April 1940 and states that PC McCartney was ‘Severely reprimanded for contravening Article 1 of the Discipline Code’. 

 

Later that same year, an entry was made under ‘Advancements, Promotions, Etc.’.

 

Advancements, Promotions, Etc

In an entry dated 29 October 1940, PC McCartney was ‘Highly Commended for promptitude and zeal displayed in effecting the arrest of three thieves.’

 

In January 1944, he was issued with ‘4 War Service Chevrons’ and a further one in October that year.

 

Sickness

Under this heading, in an entry dated 22 December 1944, John McCartney is shown reporting on sick leave with ‘Rheumatic Throat, Tubercular’. The next typed entry is dated 26 March 1945, ‘Did not resume duty, retired on pension on Medical Certificate’.

 

Advancements, Promotions, Etc

The final entry under this heading is ‘Retired on Pension (Medical Certificate)’.

Register of Deaths in the District of Morningside in the City of Edinburgh 1945

John James McCartney, (50), Police Constable (Retired), married to Catherine George Harkness, died in the City Hospital, Edinburgh, (Usual residence, 10 Lochrin Place, Edinburgh), of two types of Tuberculosis. His brother-in-law, J Harkness of 18 Piershill Square West, Edinburgh, registered the death.

 

Register of Deaths in the District of George Square in the City of Edinburgh 1975

The death of ‘McCartney,(77), Catherine George, Mother’s Maiden Name, Lees,’ was registered in ‘1975 George Square, Edinburgh, 738/1087’. 

 

The End of the Story

Please get in touch if you can assist with more family details. Please contact the site via the following link; enquiries@scottishpolicemedals.co.uk

 

War Diary of 1st Scots Guards 4 August to 17 November 1914

1st Battalion Scots Guards War Diary 1 August 1914 – 17 November 1914

(WO 95 /1263/2)

 

This is as far as possible, a verbatim transcription of the War Diary of 1st Battalion Scots Guards from 4 August 1914 to 17 November 1914.

 

The 1st Scots Guards landed with the British Expeditionary Force (BEF) in France on  14 August 1914 and thereafter took part in every major battle of that year. Their Battle Honours are ‘Retreat from Mons’, ‘Marne, 1914’, ‘Aisne, 1914’  and ‘Ypres, 1914’.

 

According to the Regimental history, the battle of most significance to the battalion was Ypres. In the four weeks of that battle from 18 October, the deaths recorded, plus the wounded and missing or captured as prisoners of war there, exceeded the total number of Scots Guardsmen who died in each of the years 1917 and 1918. At the end of the battle, the battalion only had one Captain and seventy-three men left.

 

Guardsman John James McKenzie McCartney was one of those wounded and captured in the action at Geluveld east of Ypres of 29 October 1914. He spent the next four years and one month in German prisoner of war camps at Schneidemuhl (present day Pola in Poland but then in German Silesia) and Friedrichsfeld in Germany, 60 miles north of Koln near Wesel. Friedrichsfeld housed prisoners in long timber barracks with the first POW’s in 1914 provided the labour to build them. His POW number was 62869. He was repatriated to the United Kingdom on 27 November 1918. 

 

 

1st Division, 1st Battalion Scots Guards

Hour, Date, Place

 

1914

Summary of Events and Information

Remarks and References to Appendices

Aldershot, August 4th

Order to ‘Mobilise’ received.

 

August 5th

Three parties of Reservists arrived. Magnificent, clean steady men.

 

6th

Completed to War Establishment.

 

7th

Battalion complete in every detail and ready to move by midnight.

 

8th

Perfecting arrangements.

Musketry practice and training for Reservists.

 

9th - 10th

As on 8th.

 

11th

Brigade Route March.

 

12th

General Instructions for embarkation issued.

 

13th

Entrained Farboro’ Stn. for Southampton in 2 trains.

1st left 5.30am. Arrived 6.45am. 2nd left 6.25am. Arrived 8.00am. Battalion complete with vehicles (but without horses) embarked on “SS Dunvegan Castle” sailing at 12.00 noon. Horses followed later in “SS Orange Prince”.

 

The Continent. Aug. 14th

Arrived Le Havre at about 1.00am. Disembarked and marched to camp near Harfleur (6 miles).

Horses which were left behind when Battalion embarked arrived at about 11.00am.

 

15th – 16th

Left Camp at Harfleur at 9.00pm for Lesvane stn. Entrained by 4.00am and proceeded via Rouen, Amiens, Arras, Cambrai to Le Nouvion – billeted there the night.

 

 

17th

Marched from Le Nouvion to Boue (4 miles) and billeted there.

The 1st Guards Brigade  concentrated and under orders of the Brigadier.

 

18th

Billets Boue. Brigade Route March (10 miles)

 

19th

Billets Boue. Brigade Route March (9 miles)

 

20th

Billets Boue. Brigade Route March (7 miles)

 

21st

Marched to Cartignies (10 miles) and billeted there.

 

Aug. 22nd

Marched at 2.30am by Dompierre. Halted for dinner near Beaufort. At 4.00pm, ordered to billet at Limont Fontaine, but this was countermanded and at 6.00pm marched north through Maubeuge and to billets at Grand Reng.

 

Aug. 23rd

Arrived at Grand Reng (Belgium) at 1.00am – Stood to arms at 4.30am.

‘Battle of Mons 23 August 1914’.

24th

Left at 4.00am to hold line of Main Road about 1.25 miles to NE. On reaching this point, received orders to move to a line W of Villers sur Nicole and dug a line of deep trenches to resist expected move from N. At 5.00pm moved off and marched till 10.00pm to billets at La Longueville.

‘Retreat from Mons 24 August 1914’.

25th

Left at 6.30am and went into billets at Tasnieres at 3.00pm  – the battalion being separated from the rest of the Brigade.

 

26th

Ready to leave at 5.00am but the road was blocked by British and French troops and therefore only left at 7.30am rejoining the Brigade (as reserve) at a point 1.5 miles W. of Le Grand Fayt. Early in the afternoon moved back and occupied a line W. of Errouart to cover retirement of 3rdBrigade. Marched on as rear guard to Rejet de Beaulieu the men very exhausted and wet through before they got into billets at 10.00pm. Large numbers fall out but rejoined later.

 

Aug. 27th

Moved at 6.00am and dug a line of trenches covering from just on the E. of our billets to Wassigny through Fe. De Arronnaire. Very heavy rain at noon, now drenched. At 2.00pm LF and C Coys dropped back to cover our retirement and we collected in Etreux to join the Brigade.

A number of enemy patrols E. of the town so B Coy blocked roads on that side till rear guard had passed. Moved on Guise crossing high ground in Artillery formation. Just before the 3rdCoy reached the main road, enemy opened on us with FA Howitzers and musketry, the latter at long range. Only 2 slight casualties. At dusk, the  fire died down and there was no difficulty in getting away.

Went on through Guise to Jonqueuse and bivouacked at 11.00pm – men exhausted.

Retreat from Mons – Battle of Etreaux 27 August 1914’.

Aug. 28th

Roused Battalion with difficulty and left at 4.00am.

A most trying march, very hot and constantly impeded by the 2nd Division. 1.25-hour halt near Brissay for dinners helped us along and we reached St Gobain at dusk with the loss of relatively few men.

 

29th

Stood to arms at 4.30am. Soon after 6.00am a notification came that this was to be a day of rest.

 

30th

Paraded at 12.30am and marched till 8.00am to TERNY to be General Reserve at Army HQrs. Bivouacked in field till 5.00pm then marched to Allemont and billeted.

 

31st

Moved S. on Paris – Maubeuge road at 8.00am.

Stopped N. of Soissons by report of German Cavalry Corps. Marched through Soissons up steep hill to Vaubrun and bivouacked in field.

 

Sept. 1st 1914

Wagons packed by 3.30am. Marched 6.00am through BORET DOMINIALE de METZ. Dinners at VILLERS COTTERETS. Marched to LA FERTE MILON on Route de Meaux. Took up position above and S. of town before dark, slept in cornfield for few hours. Men’s packs carried wagons specially provided.

 

Sept. 2nd

Started at 1.30am. On the Meaux road, halted for breakfast at 8.00am. Moved on at 10.45am to Chambray arriving at 2.30pm and billeted.

 

3rd

Ordered to reinforce outposts if necessary at short notice but not required. Paraded at 3.45am for rear guard and take up positions on outpost line.

Commence march at 7.20am crossing the R. Marne at Germigny. Stopped at St Jean for dinners after hot march through Bois de Meaux. Moved on to Jouarre and billeted in an old convent.

 

4th

Marched at 4.00am to Coutommiers. Ready to march at 7.00pm but move cancelled till next morning.

 

5th

Marched at 4.00am to Nestes. Battalion on outpost. Lt. Gordon Ives and 91 men arrived as reinforcements.

Cavalry patrols bothered each company.

1st Reinforcement.

Lt. Gordon Ives and 91 R and F.

 

6th

Our Corps to move N.E. from Rozoy. Our outpost line relieved by 4th Brigade. Advance guard of 1st Coldstream checked about Voinstes and had to retire under heavy shell fire. Battalion entrenched position on right rear of Brigade.. General advance at 4.30pm and met no opposition. Passed through Voinstes to Le Plessis and bivouacked.

‘Battle of the Marne 6 September 1914’.

Sept. 7th

Marched at 10.35am to Amillis for dinners. 2ndand 3rd Brigades in front by R. Aubertin and Choisy to La Frenois – Billeted.

 

8th

Started at short notice by Jouy Sur Marian, Champ Martin, Bellot where Brigade was shelled from direction of Villeneuve. Marched on to Brigade bivouac astride Hoodvilliers – Nogent road.

Battalion on outpost about Basseville with Cavalry immediately in front – 4th Brigade on left.

Lt. Monckton with reinforcements draft of 93 joined the Battalion.

2nd Reinforcement.

Lt. F.A. Monckton and 93 R. and F.

 

 

 

 

1 man wounded.

 

9th

Ready to move at 6.45am but started march later. Marched into Marne Valley, crossed river at Nogeint L’artaud, then by Charly-sur-Marne, and up steep hill to Latavodiere where halted for tea. On again at 2.30pm to bivouacs at La Marette. Rain from midnight.

 

10th

Breakfast at 4.30am, start at 7.00am, still raining, moving by Le Thiolet, Forcy, Courchamps where 3rd Brigade was heavily engaged. Halted near Sommelons for about 1.5 hours. Marched at 3.15pm to Latilly close by and billeted.

 

11th

Breakfast at 4.30am, started at 5.00am east by Lafroix, Armentieres, Nantleuit, to N.E. of Brugenes and halted. Rain in afternoon.

 

Sept. 12th

Breakfast at 5.30am, move at 9.00am by Fire en Tardenois to Soupeigne for dinners.  Move on at 4.30pm by Bruys and Mont Notre Dame to Bazoches in puring rain. One Company billeted; others bivouacked.

 

13th

Breakfast at 5.30am. Crossed the Aisne at Bourg. Moved to Pagny above Quilly and past the Tour de Paissy to Paissy where the Battalion billeted .

Some casualties from long-range artillery fire.

‘Battle of the Aisne, Passage of the Aisne,  13 September 1914’.

 

2nd Lt. W.G. Houldsworth and 3 men killed.

Lt. C.J. Balfour, 2nd Lt. G.V.F. Monckton and 11 men wounded.

 

14th

Moved at 5.30am via Moulins and Hendresse to hill between that place and Troyon – 2 Companies in Brigade reserve and 2 Companies sent as artillery escort to  Tour de Paissy.

Major J.T. Carpenter Garnier, Lt. H.R.I. Jones, 2nd Lt. R.A. Compton Thornhill and 16 men killed.

Lt. Col. H.C.Lowther, 2nd Lts. E.D. Mackenzie, J. Stirling Stewart and 86 men wounded.

12 men missing.

 

15th – 19th

In trenches near VENDRESSE.

 

20th

To billets at OEUILLY.

‘Battle of the Aisne, Actions on the Aisne Heights, 20 September 1914’

21st

Left OEUILLY at 6.00pm and relieved 6thBrigade in trenches near MOUSSY.

 

22nd –  23rd

In trenches near MOUSSY.

 

24th

Left MOUSSY for VERNEUIL and occupied trenches there.

 

Sept. 25th

In trenches at VERNEUIL.

 

26th

Left VERNEUIL at 7.00pm, marched to OEUILLY and went into billets there.

‘Battle of the Aisne, Action of Chivy, 26 September 1914’.

27th

Left billets at OEUILLY and marched to VENDRESSE occupying the trenches N. of that place.

 

Sept. 28th to October 15th

In trenches N. of VENDRESSE.

Oct. 9th. 3rd Reinforcement.

Lts. Sir J.S. Dyer, A.W. Douglas Dick, J.L. Wickham and 50 R and F.

 

Total Casualties on the Aisne

                                            

 Killed       Wounded      Missing

 

Officers             4          5         -

Other Ranks  37       157      12

 

Oct. 16th

Left trenches and marched to BLANZY going into billets there.

 

Oct. 17th

Left billets at BLANZY, marched to FISMES and entrained there leaving at 3.30pm.

 

18th

Arrived at HAZEBROUCK, detrained at 6.00pmand billeted there.

 

19th

Billets at HAZEBROUCK.

Battle of Ypres, 19 October 1914’.

20th

Left HAZEBROUCK at 9.00am and marched to POPERINGHE to billets.

 

21st

Left POPERINGHE at 5.30am and advanced to attack enemy N. of BOESINGHE in support of 4th A. C. 

Took up a line of trenches – B and LF at KOEKUIT, C and RF at BIXSCHOOTE. Find a Brigade of French Territorials between BIXSCHOOTE and canal and several regiments of Cuirassiers.

Battle of Ypres, Battle of Langemarck, 21 October 1914’.

22nd

In trenches. French territorials attack and try to turn Germans out of BIXSCHOOTE but fail. They then retire to the other side of the canal.

Camerons, Black Watch and Coldstreams heavily attacked , and the Camerons lose their trenches.

 

23rd

BIXSCHOOTE – 2nd Brigade counter attack and retake Cameron trenches, also 250 German prisoners. C Company support their advance.

 

24th

BIXSCHOOTE – Heavy shelling. Germans make a trench in front of BIXSCHOOTE but are turned out by our guns leaving all their kit in the trenches.

Total Casualties in the BIXSCHOOTE district

                                            

 Killed       Wounded      Missing

 

Officers.             1         1         -

Other Ranks      8      25        5

 

25th

Left position at 12 midnight 24th/25th being relieved in the trenches by the French.  

Battalion passed night by roadside and marched to ZILLEBEKE S. of YPRES, going into billets.

 

Oct. 26th

Left ZILLEBEKE 5.30am and marched via HOOGE and reinforced firing line on L. of 2ndDivision at GHELUVELT. Made an attack over very open ground towards POZELHOEK but was held up enemy’s artillery and machine gun fire.

Took over Bedford’s trenches in the evening.

Killed: Capt. C.F.P Hamilton.

 

Wounded: Lts. M.O. Roberts and J.L. Wickham.

 

27th

In trenches at GHELUVELT. Fairly quiet day.

The chateau, gardens and village were shelled.

Killed: Capt. R.F. Balfour.

28th

In trenches at GHELUVELT. Receive warning from our Intelligence that German XXVII Reserve have been brought up and will attack at 5.30am tomorrow. 

Lt. R. H. Fitzroy and 2nd Lt. J. Stirling Stuart joined Battalion.

 

Oct. 29th

In trenches at GHELUVELT (GELUVELD). Attack commenced punctually at 5.30am on North Front. Heavy execution done by C and LF. At about 12 noon, the line on the East side at the cross roads on the YPRES road, held by the Gloucesters, is broken, and the Coldstream and Black Watch are successively rolled up and retire – RF and half B Coy and 2 sections of C Coy are thus isolated and surrounded, and nothing more heard of them.

2 Platoons of C Coy and half of LF are brought to E. side and with the help of the stragglers, collected by Capt. Stephen, hold enemy off all day until account for many Germans. 3rd Brigade is brought up in the evening and line readjusted.

Battle of Ypres, Battle of Gheluvelt, 29 October 1914’.

 

Killed: Lt. Sir G. N. Ogilvy Bt.

 

Wounded: Capt. & Adjt. A. A. L. Stephen D.S.O (Died of wounds). Capt. Sir V.A.F. Mackenzie Bt., Lt. Hon. G.E.H. Macdonald (Missing).

 

Missing: Capt. C. E. dela Pasture, Lts. B. G. Joliffe, C.F.F. Campbell, H. Fitzroy.

 

(NB – There is no mention of the ‘other ranks’ killed, wounded or missing. See below.) 

 

(This is the action in which John James McKenzie McCartney was wounded and captured.)

 

Oct. 30th

Heavy shelling. Enemy’s infantry had retired out of sight but the roads E. of GHELUVELT are full of them. The S. W. Borderers are now on our R. and then Welsh and Queen’s across MENIN road.

Killed: Capt. W.J. Wickham.

 

Wounded: Major B.G. Van de Weyer (Prisoner).

 

Oct. 31st

The day commenced with very heavy shelling of the 3rd Brigade. About 11.00am the Welsh and Queen’s give. Soon after, half a Bn. S.W. Borderers retired, and half LF brought up to reinforce line but enemy advanced along MENIN road and occupied GHELUVELT village. An hour later, half bn. Worcester regt. Made counter attack and drove enemy of chateau gardens back to wood.

At dusk, retirement ordered to new line 1000 yards in rear which was carried out unmolested.

 

Nov. 1st

Trenches between VELDHOEK and GHELUVELT.

Dug new trenches during the night – Fairly quiet day. C Gloucesters on our right.

In the evening, Capt. Christie Miller and 200 men Coldstream Guards took over from Gloucesters  and held barricade across MENIN road, - the 2/KRR  on their right.

 

Nov. 2nd

Very heavy shelling, barricade destroyed. Coldstream and KRR driven back. Enemy advanced down MENIN road and opened with machine guns at our rear and also enfilade artillery fire.

C Coy driven back so as to face road. Line readjusted in the evening 300 yards in rear.

Wounded: Lt. Sir I. Colquhoun Bt.

Nov. 3rd

VELTHOEK. New Line consisted of a Bn. Of Zouavres and L.N. Lancs. On MENIN road, Scots Guards, Camerons, Black Watch.

Dig new trenches during night.

 

Nov. 4th

Quiet day. Make point d’appui near wood round burnt farm house.

 

Nov. 5th

Heavy shelling.

4th Reinforcement.

Sgt. Howson and 50 R and F.

 

Nov. 6th

VELTHOEK. Fairly quiet day.

5th Reinforcement.

Lt. B.W. Smith and 50 R and F.

 

Nov. 7th

VELTHOEK. Heavy shelling.

Killed: Lt. R. A. Gipps, Lt. F. A. Monckton.

 

Wounded: Lt. B.W. Smith (Died of Wounds), 2nd Lt. J. S. Stuart (Died of wounds), Lt. Sir J. S. Dyer Bt.

 

Missing: Lt. A. W. Douglas Dick.

 

Nov. 8th

VELTHOEK. Heavy shelling. Enemy break through French and N. Lancs., get into communication trench and enfilade battalion trenches. L. N. Lancs. and our supports counter attacked and regained lost trenches. Germans remained in right trenches. Attempts made to turn them out with machine gun fire.

 

Nov. 9th

VELTHOEK. Fairly quiet day.

 

Nov. 10th

VELTHOEK. Heavy shelling.

 

Nov. 11th

VELTHOEK. Terrific shelling commencing at 6.30am and lasting for 3 hours. All trenches and dug-outs were knocked in. The Prussian Guard attacked through VELTHOEK and took the front trenches along the whole of 1stBrigade. Our men in orchard held  on till trenches on either side were occupied by the enemy and did good execution. The point d’appui was shelled to pieces early in the morning and then attacked by infantry from the wood.

Only 5 men from the fire trench, 30 from the orchard, 4 from point d’appui and Battn. Hd. Qtrs.’.  Escaped and managed to re-join rest of Brigade at dusk.

Enemy got within 200 yards of our guns but were driven back losing very heavily.

 

Nov. 12th

The 1st Brigade went back to HOOGE in reserve -Capt. Stracey and 6 R and F Scots Guards, Capt. Fortune and 109 men Black Watch, Col. McEwen, Major Craig Browne, Lt. Dunsterville and 140 men Cameron Hrs. 

Made dug-outs in wood opposite HOOGE Chateau.

 

Nov. 13th

In dug-outs.

 

Nov. 14th

Moved over to N. side of road and made new dug-outs.

 

Nov. 15th

Snow and rain. The whole place a sea of mud.

 

Nov. 16th

Left HOOGE and marched via VLAMERTINGE to WESTOUTRE and billeted there. Lt. Col. Lowther CVO, CMG, DSO re-joined the Battalion.

Total Casualties in the YPRES district

                                                 Killed       Wounded      Missing

 

Officers.              9         7         5

Other Ranks  105     151     430

 

(NB – This is the only reference to the 535 ‘other ranks’ killed or missing near Ypres or indeed the 151 men wounded in action. That may well have been over half the strength of the 1st Scots Guards and would account for what followed.)

 

Nov. 17th

Marched to BORRE near HAZEBROUCK and went into billets for rest and refitment, remaining there until December 20th.

 

(During this time, the Battalion were inspected by the Commander in Chief Sir John French GCB etc on 28th November and by His Majesty King George V on 3rd  December.)

 

 

 

 

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